The languages and translations

(en francais) / (auf deutsch)

All thoughts down below are from a german, french and english language perspective. The complexity of Language is a very important and big subject. That’s why we try to deal with it, by being at the same time limited by our languages and language experiences.

Like already been mentioned at the article on the statement, the affected person should best decide for themselves which language(s) she_he want to use. If the person is dictating a text or an audio file is transcribed, we try to keep the writing as close to what have been said. From our point of view the syntax of the interviewed Person don’t have to be right, because the most important is the content. If the person express the desire to be corrected or improved, we try to do this as best as possible. The translations are partially made with the person together, but most are made later by various people. The translations paid also attention to the points above.

However, there are some difficulties which we have to be aware of.

First, a one to one transfer of what is said to Written is hardly possible.
Because Some words can be misunderstood or the same tonality allows several written options. The punctuation position is often influenced by the person writing. Of course in the end the text is revised, when possible together, to avoid inconsistencies and strive for a better understanding, but it can’t be fully guaranteed.

Secondly, the above-mentioned complications are reinforced by translations. And it come to many questions. For example how do you translate proverbs in other languages, where there are not used? How is it with the various different weights and meanings of some words in the most diverse contexts? How to translate words free of gender, if the similar word in the other language has a gender? Also it is possible that there are new questions of comprehension, which you cannot ask anymore to the person.

And do you correct wrong syntax? And if, how are you writing them incorrectly in another language?

And thirdly, the output language are often not used for translations, but another already existing. That means linguistic, but also personal and diverse different interpretation are more likely through the process of translation.

A strict predefined dealing with these difficulties aren’t and shouldn’t be existing.
The most important guideline is to remain as close to the original speech and / or text, however changes are, especially in translations, inevitable.
All translators should be aware of this and find a critical handling of it for themselves. Error can never be ruled out entirely.

Our priority is not to claim a perfect translation and language, but it should be understandable and close to the original. We also demand that every translation (if possible) should have at least a reference to the original.

Nevertheless, the efforts shouldn’t be mitigated, to create a mutually satisfactory transmission of the spoken words or written material.

And do you correct wrong syntax? And if, how are you writing them incorrectly in another language?

And thirdly, the output language are often not used for translations, but another already existing. That means linguistic, but also personal and diverse different interpretation are more likely through the process of translation.

A strict predefined dealing with these difficulties aren’t and shouldn’t be existing.
The most important guideline is to remain as close to the original speech and / or text, however changes are, especially in translations, inevitable.
All translators should be aware of this and find a critical handling of it for themselves. Error can never be ruled out entirely.

Our priority is not to claim a perfect translation and language, but it should be understandable and close to the original. We also demand that every translation (if possible) should have at least a reference to the original.

Nevertheless, the efforts shouldn’t be mitigated, to create a mutually satisfactory transmission of the spoken words or written material.